TurtlesTravel http://turtlestravel.com Break out of your shell . . . and explore the world! Thu, 02 Jul 2015 19:43:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 Street Art: Berlin’s East Side Gallery http://turtlestravel.com/street-art-berlin-east-side-gallery/ http://turtlestravel.com/street-art-berlin-east-side-gallery/#comments Wed, 01 Jul 2015 15:56:47 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14301   The East Side Gallery should be on everyone’s to do list when visiting Berlin. The gallery is a section of the original Berlin Wall spanning nearly a mile on Mühlenstraße...

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Street Art Berlin

“Diagonale Lösung des Problems” (Diagonal Solution to Problems) by Michail Serebrjakow. A raised thumb chained to a wrist . . . what does “Yes” mean when “No” is not an option?

 

The East Side Gallery should be on everyone’s to do list when visiting Berlin. The gallery is a section of the original Berlin Wall spanning nearly a mile on Mühlenstraße along the river Spree (the border at the time). Shortly after the Wall came down in 1989, 105 art pieces were commissioned and painted along this section. Since they were originally installed, there has been some erosion of the concrete as well as quite a bit of graffiti and random people signing the wall. While we ended up feeling like those two additions take something away from the art, the pieces are still amazing. Visiting early in the morning, or around sundown, you can avoid the big tour buses and groups crowding the most famous pieces. A walk taking in most of the pieces will take a couple of hours if you stop frequently to reflect. The Gallery is also easily explored by bike. Enjoy some of our favorites from the area.

Click to view slideshow.

If you like this post, please check out these other great street art cities.

 

Amor in Getsemani Graffiti

Cartagena, Colombia

Mural on Calle 26, Bogota

Bogota, Colombia

Graffiti of Dali

Medellin, Colombia

The Golden Muse

Cincinnatio, Ohio

Philadelphia Murals

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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More Money Saving Tips: Online Shopping Portals http://turtlestravel.com/more-money-saving-tips-online-shopping-portals/ http://turtlestravel.com/more-money-saving-tips-online-shopping-portals/#comments Mon, 29 Jun 2015 16:52:30 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14289 Online Shopping Portals We’ve written before about ways to save money for travel, but our methods work no matter what you’re saving for. We’re always searching for new money-saving methods...

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online shopping portalsOnline Shopping Portals

We’ve written before about ways to save money for travel, but our methods work no matter what you’re saving for. We’re always searching for new money-saving methods and tricks. Companies don’t always make it easy to take advantage of all of their programs and promotions, but a little leg work can add up to big savings. Once you’re all set up, there’s very little extra effort required to start seeing savings pile up.

Did you know that a simple click means you can get money back on the vast majority of purchases you make online? If you’ve bought anything online from electronics at BestBuy to booking a hotel room on Hotels.com and haven’t clicked through a shopping portal first, you’ve missed out on some serious potential savings. We tend to shop locally for necessary items while we travel, but traveling all the time also means that we do a lot of shopping via the internet. When we shop for gifts, for example, we can have items shipped to the recipient on time no matter where we happen to be. Our jobs in mobile marketing also mean that we spend a fair amount of someone else’s money. We figured, why not earn cash back on those purchases as well?

Shopping Portals / Cashback Sites

There are a handful of main players competing for your loyalty in the online shopping portal game. With most, including all those we’ve tried out, sign-up is completely free. The companies make their money from advertisers, not members.  It’s like sharing the commission they get for providing the incentive to shop with certain vendors. Most of these programs work in generally the same way. You log into your account, find the vendor you’re looking for, and click over to their website to make your purchase.

Since most of our online purchases are travel-related, it’s good to note that clicking through a shopping portal does not affect your ability to earn hotel points or frequent flyer miles. Stack your savings!

Our Experience with Ebates and Mainstreet Shares

MainStreetSHARES

The first program we joined was called BigCrumbs. I did a lot of research before deciding what company’s philosophy I liked best, in addition to how the cashback options worked. BigCrumbs has rebranded recently as MainStreetSHARES. According to their website, the idea is to be a partner rather than just a member. They say,  “Our members earn money each month by shopping at top online stores. They also receive a percentage of company revenueearn commissions when their referrals shop, and receive a payout when MainStreetSHARES is acquired.” Well, who knows if MainSteetSHARES will ever be acquired, but I like the idea of earning shares on top of cash back. MainStreetSHARES also seems to have higher percentages overall. On the other hand, the total number of vendors they work with is smaller. MainSteetSHARES pays out monthly. It’s easiest to link your PayPal account and get that money automatically. Amazon purchases were not eligible for Mainstreet Shares, so we decided to look into Ebates as well.

Ebates Coupons and Cash Back

Ebates cashback program is one of the most popular out there. Their site is very user-friendly and straightforward too. We’ve earned about $500 so far this year in cashback credits. We’ve used the Ebates site mostly for hotel reservations and car rental. Ebates pays out once per quarter, and we’ve found it’s easiest to link our PayPal account and have the money go straight there. There are also options to have a physical check sent, or to have a check sent to a designated charity!

There was a bit of a catch to the Amazon affiliation in that Ebates only credits certain types of purchases. It seems to be items in a certain department like Fashion, Amazon Local or Sports. It also looks like you have to go through Ebates for each individual purchase, but we honestly haven’t tested that out yet. It always pays to read the fine print, but we figure it’s all gravy anyway. We’ve found Ebates to have some good special promotions though, so keep an eye out for those.

Comparison Shopping: Tips and Advice

Before logging into your shopping portal account, it’s best to comparison shop. Some portals seem to have their own pricing with different partners, so you are at an advantage if you have an idea of the cost of what you’re looking for. For example, we’ve found hotels using Hotels.com or Agoda, only to log in to Ebates and have said hotel not appear in the results.

You should also compare the cashback rates for shopping portals you’re signed up with. There’s often a difference in cashback rates, so see which one is the most advantageous when you’re ready to make a purchase, and use the one that’s convenient and profitable for you at that time. Keep an eye out for limited-time promotions as well. Sites like Cashbackholic are great for this purpose. Oh, and speaking of stacking, if you’re using a cashback credit card to make these purchases, you’re potentially earning even more.

Disclaimer

While we wrote this post purely to share our experiences with these tow online shopping portals and help you get some money back on online purchases, the links included are personal referrals. While this doesn’t affect your sign-up in any way, it does mean we will potentially receive a bonus if you do decide to register and use the service. Neither of these sites are going to make you rich by any means, but every little bit helps, right?

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Immerse Yourself in Historic Bath http://turtlestravel.com/historic-bath-england/ http://turtlestravel.com/historic-bath-england/#comments Tue, 28 Apr 2015 14:00:20 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14190 Confession: we almost skipped historic Bath, worried that the famous spa town might be too touristy. Popular for so long with fashionable society, we pictured the streets of Bath crowded...

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Roman Relic Found Buried Under Modern Day Bath

Roman Relic Found Buried Under Modern Day Bath

Confession: we almost skipped historic Bath, worried that the famous spa town might be too touristy. Popular for so long with fashionable society, we pictured the streets of Bath crowded with well-to-do weekenders carrying bags from high-end shops, taking breaks from hours of pampering and massage. You can certainly find these things, but there are many other ways to experience Bath. We focused our short stop on history and architecture, and had a great day and a half exploring this UNESCO designated World Heritage site. We began with a thorough orientation via a wonderful, free walking tour led by the Mayor of Bath Honorary Guides. The walks start outside the Pump Room of the Roman Baths in Abbey Church Yard, at the sign reading ‘Free Walking Tours Here’. The tour lasts about 2.5 hours, and includes all the main points of historical and architectural interest, as well as fascinating anecdotes and personal stories from the guide.

The Royal Cresent

The Royal Cresent

Historic Bath

No one knows for sure how long the hot springs at Bath have been a destination. It’s certain that they were known when the Romans built their temple here around 50 AD. At the same time, public baths were built on these natural springs, whose waters rise at 46C (about 115F). The remains of the Roman settlement and buildings were lost as Roman civilization declined. Bath remained as a relatively market town through the middle ages and through the 17th Century. People were still drawn here for the curative properties of the spring, and Bath water has been bottled and sold since the 1661! In the 18th Century, Bath became more fashionable. Richard “Beau” Nash was Master of Ceremonies, and the minority lived the high life under his supervision. It was also during this time that many of the architecturally significant buildings were constructed. These include the magnificent Georgian Circus and Royal Crescent as well as Queen Square and Pulteney Bridge, among others. We learned an interesting tidbit about the Circus and the Royal Crescent representing the Sun and the Moon. In addition to their general shapes, the Circus has elements such as an acorn motif, an important symbol of the Druids.

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey

While waiting for the walking tour to begin, we spent some time in Bath Abbey. There has been some form of Christian worship on the site for over a thousand years. First, there was an Anglo-Saxon monastery. This was torn down by Norman conquerors, who built a grand Norman cathedral. That building ended up in ruins by late 15th century. Work on the present Abbey Church began around 1499, but it has undergone various transformations. The abbey today displays great examples of fan vaulting, ornamental pinnacles and ‘battlemented’ parapets and turrets. The stained glass is pretty amazing, too. The big, stained glass window at the East End depicts 56 scenes in the life of Jesus Christ. One interesting fact we learned about the outside of the church is about the ladders of angels who appear to be ascending into heaven. This vision is from a dream of the once-Bishop of Bath, Oliver King. The ladders stop above the level of the doors of the church, showing people that they needed to enter the church as a means to make it to heaven. You can’t just climb the ladder on your own.

Inside Bath Abbey

Inside Bath Abbey

Roman Bath

Roman Baths

The Roman Baths are some of the best preserved, and even though they have been extensively explored and restored, there’s plenty still being discovered. The entrance fee includes an audio guide that you can either borrow and return, or simply download on your smartphone (as we did). There’s a ton of information to absorb, so it’s nice to have your own guide to pick and choose the sections you want to hear about in more depth. Interestingly, the Roman temple at Bath was dedicated to both a Celtic god (Sul) and to the Roman god of healing, Minerva. The sacred areas of the temple were separate from the public bathing areas. The complex is sprawling, and constitutes an amazing feat of engineering focused on aqueducts and arches. Water had to be piped for miles, with methods for keeping it flowing, and at different temperatures. A visit to the Baths might include a cold bath (in the frigidarium), a warm bath (in the tepidarium) and a hot bath (in the caldarium). There would have been a swimming pool, exercise area, and spaces for massage and other body cleansing rituals.

The Source

The Source

The King's Spring in the Pump Room

The King’s Spring in the Pump Room

Taking the Waters

When visiting historic Bath, it’s customary to “take the waters.” Back in the 17th century, medical practices of the day encouraged the drinking of spa water for its curative properties. The Pump Room in Bath was opened in 1706 for this purpose, and it was here that we got a glass of the sulfuric-smelling, metallic-tasting elixir to try for ourselves. It was warm and a bit smelly, but I for one was sure to drink down to the last drop. You never know what miracles it might work. There are said to be 43 minerals in the waters of Bath. Calcuim and sulphate are the main ingredients, along with sodium, chloride and many others. In medieval times the waters were said to cure everything from paralysis to gout.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen made Bath her home from 1801 to 1806 and set two of her six published novels (Northanger Abbey and Persuasion) here. Running along the backside of the Circus, not far from the Royal Crescent, is a quiet lane, known as a sort of Lover’s Lane in Austen’s time. This Gravel Walk was the setting for a touching scene between Anne Elliot and her Captain Wentworth. You can visit the Jane Austen Centre (located at 40 Gay Street) to learn more about Bath during the Regency period of British history and about the society, music and fashion that Jane Austen would have experienced when she lived here. For true fans, there is a free audio tour you can download and listen to as you walk around town. The tour guides you around interesting spots in city and includes extracts from Jane Austen’s novels and letters, along with a map to follow.

Our room at the Dorian House.

Our room at the Dorian House.

Where to Stay

There is a wide range of accommodation options in and around Bath: funky boutique hotels, cozy B&Bs, rural farmstays and inns. We opted for the lovely Dorian House, a Victorian mansion with a luxury feel, but still accessible within our limited budget. Located a short, 10-minute walk from the center of town, Dorian House is in a quiet neighborhood. Our top-floor room had a view of the Royal Crescent in the distance, lovely. The bed was beyond comfy, and the marble shower a true pleasure after a long day walking the town. The included breakfast starts the day right with fruit, granola, freshly baked items, and coffee . . . followed by a Full English. We sampled a lot of these during our time in England, but Dorian’s stood out for its quality ingredients. As for dining out, we can recommend a good Nepalese meal at Yak Yeti Yak downtown.

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Food for Thought with Uncornered Market http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-uncornered-market/ http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-uncornered-market/#comments Fri, 24 Apr 2015 13:00:06 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14249 Through our ongoing series, Food for Thought, we explore the complex relationship between food and culture, as seen through the eyes of travelers. As we travel, our minds are opened, and our understanding...

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Through our ongoing series, Food for Thought, we explore the complex relationship between food and culture, as seen through the eyes of travelers. As we travel, our minds are opened, and our understanding of how peoples’ relationship with food shapes their (and our) perspectives deepens. With each new interview, we feel more connected to a community of travelers who seek to explore the world more profoundly. Though there are certainly many ways to experience culture, eating traditional dishes, sharing a meal with local friends and shopping in the market have become some of our favorite ways to start the exploration. We have been following the adventures of Dan and Audrey at Uncornered Market for years, almost since we started traveling together. We count on their blog for real, useful information wrapped in beautiful storytelling, and illustrated with amazing photography. As a couple we truly admire, we’re honored to have them share their perspectives. If for some crazy reason, you hadn’t discovered Uncornered Market yet, we’re happy you’ve found them here!

Food for ThoughtMeet Daniel and Audrey

Daniel Noll and Audrey Scott are the husband-and-wife storytelling team behind Uncornered Market.  At the end of 2006, they left their office jobs for what was meant to be a 12-18 month creative sabbatical to travel the world. Over 90 countries and eight years later, they are still going…and still married.

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Food for Thought

The underlying idea of the “Food for Thought” series is that to truly experience a culture you must taste it. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

People whose interests and hot buttons are other living cultural dimensions (e.g., religion, music, etc.) might disagree.  For me, however, food is among the most effective experience dimensions and conduits to a culture because of the range of senses it engages. Playing devil’s culinary advocate, however, you could go to the market and get a sense of the way a culture interacts, does business, relates to food — all without ever having tasted anything. So it’s not only about the taste of the food, but also the backstory of the culture’s relationship with it, from ingredients to table. Perhaps most importantly, food is one of the best ways to connect to local people – everyone needs to eat and we find that local people love talking about and sharing their cuisine.

"Steamed Dumplings (Momos) - Bakhtapur, Nepal"

“Steamed Dumplings (Momos) – Bakhtapur, Nepal”

 

What food do you identify with “home?” Does it reflect something about your own culture or upbringing?  Do you crave it while you’re away?

I suppose pizza, but that’s a little too easy.  American food, if there is such a thing, is difficult to characterize because it’s such a melting pot and clearinghouse of cuisines.  I arrived at adulthood just as the U.S. began its multicultural food thing and began to come out of the dark ages in terms of beer and wine.  There’s no food I really crave while away, particularly now that you can get just about anything, anywhere. What I might crave from the United States, if I don’t have it, is variety. Having said all that, the American meal I tend to consistently enjoy most is Thanksgiving, not only for the terrific flavors, but also for the notion of a holiday that’s not about buying gifts but about getting friends and family together to eat and be thankful.

How has travel affected the way you think about food?

Travel has affected the way I think about food as much as food has affected the way I think about travel. I point back to my first answer, that it’s a key experience dimension and a conduit to understanding a culture.  Travel can open the mind, so it makes sense that the more one travels, the more evolved their thinking is regarding food and how fundamental a culture’s relationship to food is to the core of who they are.

As for my background, even before I began writing about travel, I had an instinctual feeling for the importance of food. This is due in great part to how I grew up. Generally, my family was pretty thoughtful regarding food choices, I was exposed to vegetarians, my mother spoke of her time growing up on a farm, my father recently launched a community supported agriculture project. Stuff like that helps.  The places I lived just out of university — Washington DC and San Francisco — were also important in framing and developing my understanding of food and world cuisine.

Nasi Campur-Uncornered Market

“Plate of Nasi Campur – Sanur, Bali”

 

Do you have a technique to try and understand local cuisine? (ie: Attending cooking classes or food tours? Hunting the best street food?)

Get in there.  Follow your curiosity and ask questions.  Lean in with an open mind and without judgement. When you show genuine interest you’ll not only make inroads to understanding the local cuisine, you’ll also often make some friends. When we ask locals for recommendations, we ask them specifically for a place where they would eat.  Otherwise, some people will recommend places they think tourists want to eat.

We are big fans of using street food as a tool for exploration.  A street food adventure will often take you to places outside the normal tourist zones and you’ll be up close to the action – the cooking and eating with locals on tiny plastic chairs.

Cooking classes, especially those that include a market visit and are very hands on, can be really useful in demystifying seemingly complex cuisines and providing great background to the cultural context of certain dishes. The cooking class we took in Bali, for example, really opened our eyes to the wonders of traditional Balinese cuisine (compared to what was often served in restaurants).

Cooking Lessons, Varanasi Style

Cooking Lessons, Varanasi Style

 

Tell us about a memorable meal that was so special it is forever ingrained in your memory. Where was it and what set it apart? What was served, and who shared it with you?

I think there are several hundred.  Here’s one (OK, two) that scores on context.  Back in 2008, Audrey and I traveled through India.  Along the way, we got a message from one of the programmers who helped me with an especially technical bit with the first incarnation of Uncornered Market.  He asked (on Facebook, if I remember correctly) whether we had planned to visit his hometown, Chandigarh.  We really didn’t, but who were we to say no.

Anyhow, we showed up in town, saw the office space he shared with his business partner.  For lunch, they took us back to their apartment.  Pretty sparse bachelor pad, they asked their live-in cook to make malai kofte, a classic northern Indian Punjabi dish with paneer and vegetable dumplings in a cream gravy.  It was terrific — and kind of unbelievable that we’d brought the story full circle.

Earlier that morning, we’d had some of the world’s best channa batura (masala spiced chickpeas with a puri-like fried, puffed flatbread) at a sweets shop below our hotel.  I’d poked my nose into the kitchen and began photographing.  One thing led to another.  This is my answer to #4 in action.

What food have you tried in your travels that some might find shocking or surprising? Would you eat it again?

Here’s one from a recent trip:  Lyonnais andouillette.  It’s just a sausage made entirely of visible chunks of offal.  Even locals in Lyon will tell you it’s hard to take.  I found the smell profound, especially after it had been warmed in red wine.  I’m glad I tried it, but I don’t think I need to do it again.  That is, unless I’m invited to a farm or a restaurant where, under the circumstances, it must be tried again.

Cretan Snails-Uncornered Market

Traditional Cretan Meal of Snails

And just for fun, if you had to choose one country’s cuisine to eat for the rest of your life what would it be?

I go back and forth on this one.  Italy, Thailand, and Japan are all contenders. But in the end, probably India.  The variety is astounding and even in my fairly wide-ranging travels of the country, I don’t even think I’ve scratched the surface.

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Legacy of the Swedish Warship Vasa http://turtlestravel.com/swedish-warship-vasa/ http://turtlestravel.com/swedish-warship-vasa/#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2015 14:00:55 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14185 A Brief History of the Swedish Warship Vasa On the 10th of August 1628, the Swedish warship Vasa set off on her maiden voyage.  Never leaving Stockholm Harbor, she sank...

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Vasa

A Brief History of the Swedish Warship Vasa

On the 10th of August 1628, the Swedish warship Vasa set off on her maiden voyage.  Never leaving Stockholm Harbor, she sank after sailing no more than 1300 meters (less than a mile). Although her guns were salvaged in the 1660s, the wreck sat underwater for 333 years before breaking the surface once again in 1961. Today, the Vasa Museum offers a unique glimpse into life in the early 1600s in Sweden, when Tall Ships dominated shipbuilding in the region.

1 : 10 scale model of the Swedish warship Vasa

1 : 10 scale model of the Swedish warship Vasa, complete with paint

 

One of the most amazing things about the Vasa is that it’s about 98% original! It’s the only ship of its kind to have been restored to such an original state. Putting the Swedish warship Vasa back together must have been like assembling a massive jigsaw puzzle, but with no photo on the box to go by. In addition to the pieces of hull and parts of the ship itself, there were over 40,000 other objects found with the Vasa! Even for those of us who are normally not big on visiting museums, the Vasa is truly impressive. It took many years to restore the Vasa to her former glory. Even the process of drying and preserving the wood is fascinating: 17 years of spraying and chemical-treating to prevent the waterlogged wood from shrinking and cracking! Researchers even studied paint chips to see how the many wooden sculptures that adorned the Vasa might have looked.

Vasa Carvings

Details of some of the many carvings on the Vasa. A roaring lion’s head on the gun port was meant to intimidate the enemy.

 

Take Your Time Exploring the Museum

When you enter on the 4th Floor of the exhibition, check to see the time of the next orientation movie in your language. It’s worth seeing the film early in your visit to get a little history. Additionally, there’s a cool app you can download on the museum’s free WiFi. With the app you can decide which areas to hear more thorough detail about. There are so many sections and sub-sections, it’s hard to choose. Audio segments cover everything from stories of what life was like at the time of the ship’s building to the nitty gritty of scientific research and how the ship was raised.

Swedish warship Vasa Stern

The massive stern looking up from almost the bottom, more lions on the gunports

 

This level focuses on history.  What was life like in early 17th century Sweden? What led to the building of the Vasa? Who was blamed when she sank? Another exhibit places the Vasa and her sculptures into historical context. There is also a great display on how divers spearheaded the salvaging of the ship, and how the massive, thick cables were placed beneath the ship to finally raise her to the surface using air bags.

Vasa Crew Re-creation

Eerily lifelike recreation of a lost Vasa crew member

 

There are smaller exhibitions within the museum on various topics. On the lowest level, “The Shipyard” shows how ships were built around the time of the Vasa. “Face to Face” shows the collection of skeletons and personal items found within the Vasa. It’s amazing what they have been able to piece together from DNA and from studying the bones themselves. In this area there are also reconstructions of what the “lost” may have looked like in life. Hair, eyes, expressions: the heads are so lifelike, it’s scary! The lower level also has detailed information on the group working to preserve the Vasa: what they faced when the ship was first raised, the process that led to the museum today, and plans for the future.

Vasa Starboard

Another highlight for us was using interactive computer terminals to create a ship like the Vasa and see how it fared as winds picked up and the ship set sail. You could choose the general shape of the vessel, how many guns and supplies, which sails to set, etc.

If there’s one museum you visit when in Stockholm, make it the Vasa. It’s completely impossible to capture the grand scale or the minute details of this remarkable ship in photos.

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Food for Thought with Till The Money Runs Out http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-till-the-money-runs-out/ http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-till-the-money-runs-out/#comments Fri, 17 Apr 2015 14:00:16 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14208 The intersection of food, travel and culture is an endlessly interesting place. For many travelers, a meal can be a great way to break down barriers and share an experience...

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The intersection of food, travel and culture is an endlessly interesting place. For many travelers, a meal can be a great way to break down barriers and share an experience even when language is a challenge. Whether it’s shopping in a local market and discovering a new ingredient or spice, finding the best street food, or maybe best of all, being invited home for some home-cooking, food brings people together. The Food for Thought series explores how the way people travel is influenced by food, and how what we eat is influenced by our travels. This week we chat with Tom and Jenny from Till the Money Runs Out. We share a love of “hot weather and spicy food” with this pair, and always enjoy reading their posts on everything from top “things to do” to detailed recipes as in their recent post, “A Tale of Two Baklava Recipes.” Read on to get their perspectives on food and travel in this week’s interview.

IMG_2459Meet Tom and Jenny

We are Tom and Jenny, we started traveling together in 2011 on savings and planned on traveling “till the money runs out” at which point we would go back and get “real jobs.”  We started an app development company on the road and have been calling anywhere with an internet connection “the home office” for the last four years.  Our mutual love of hot weather and spicy food means that we can usually be found close to the equatorial belt.

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Food for Thought

The underlying idea of the “Food for Thought” series is that to truly experience a culture you must taste it. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

Oh totally, though I do think the same can be said for many of the senses. Taste, smells, sounds and sights; traveling is so immersive it would be hard to get a full picture of any place without a combination of some of the senses. Food is also one of the easier ways to relate with people cross-culturally. We may not be able to speak Vietnamese, but in a Banh mi shop in Vietnam we can look over at other patrons with a big grin and a thumbs up and there is a great sense of camaraderie as we all enjoy the same meal.

JennyMexcio

What food do you identify with “home?” Does it reflect something about your own culture or upbringing?  Do you crave it while you’re away?

Jenny: I am from San Diego, CA and was raised by parents who met each other on a hippie commune so this may sound incongruous but, I relate Mexican food and vegetarian “hippie” food with home. I would say the two dishes that make me think the most of “home” are tofu sandwiches and burritos. One represents my family and the other the city I grew up in. I definitely crave Mexican food when I am not in San Diego. We are traveling in Mexico now so that is not currently an issue :)

Tom: Home is a tougher concept for me. I had very adventurous parents and while growing up we called many places “home.” I was born in Costa Rica where my parents learned to cook black beans and rice, called “El Casado” or “married” in Spanish. It is a dish that stuck with us, and though we moved away from Costa Rica when I was 5 we continued to cook it and if I had to associate one meal with “home” that would probably be it. I don’t necessarily crave it, but I would never turn down a plate of El Casado.

How has travel affected the way you think about food?

We have found one of the things in common with many of our favorite dishes around the world is that they tend to have just a few ingredients. The key is using the right amount of each ingredient. We usually stick to places with a similar warm climate around the world and love seeing how different countries combine the same types of foods in different ways to make completely different meals. Travel has also taught me (Jenny) to be really open-minded about food. To try to approach every meal with an open mind without thinking that I don’t like one ingredient or another. It’s amazing how many different foods I thought I didn’t like or wouldn’t like that I have whole-heartedly enjoyed.

Thai farm Chiang Mai cooking school review

Do you have a technique to try and understand local cuisine? (ie: Attending cooking classes or food tours? Hunting the best street food?)

We do attend cooking classes often, but our best technique is just looking for where the crowd is. If there is a line at one lady’s mushroom soup stall in a night market in Thailand, or if every seat at at a taco stand is taken with people standing behind them, you know it’s gotta be good.

Tell us about a memorable meal that was so special it is forever ingrained in your memory. Where was it and what set it apart? What was served, and who shared it with you?

We always come back to the same meal when we talk about our most memorable. When we were traveling in Germany we were invited to come and stay with a couple who are old family friends of Tom’s parents. We stayed with Harald and Shoko for just a few days and each morning we would wake up and have the most amazing breakfasts. We would linger over the dining room table for an hour or more talking about travel, the world, music, books or anything else that came while enjoying soft-boiled eggs, fresh greens from the garden, different types of breads, cheeses, meats and butter, honey and jam. The classic German breakfast of a little of everything. These meals showed us that more than anything what often makes a wonderful meal is the company you have while you eat it, and taking the time to enjoy it slowly.

TomVietnam

What food have you tried in your travels that some might find shocking or surprising? Would you eat it again?

That’s a tough question because I know many Europeans find it shocking how much I love peanut butter :)

What is shocking to some people is pretty common place somewhere else. We have eaten the usual “shockers,” from ants and grasshoppers all the way to guinea pigs and kangaroos. We also don’t shy away from heart, tongue or liver. Almost anything is good if it’s prepared well.

And just for fun, if you had to choose one country’s cuisine to eat for the rest of your life what would it be?

Tom: Mexico. I never get sick of tacos.

Jenny: It’s a bit of toss up between Mexican and Thai. I think Thai wins out because of how many more vegetables are used.  I could eat spicy, fish-saucy, vegetable combinations for every meal!

All images provided by Tom and Jenny from Till The Money Runs Out.  Connect with them via PinterestInstagram, or Facebook!

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Is Stonehenge Worth a Visit? http://turtlestravel.com/is-stonehenge-worth-a-visit/ http://turtlestravel.com/is-stonehenge-worth-a-visit/#comments Mon, 06 Apr 2015 14:44:03 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14146 Why is Stonehenge on the Must-See List? Admittedly, we aren’t huge fans of the “must do” or “must see” attractions during our travels.  This may be because we think they...

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Stonehenge

Why is Stonehenge on the Must-See List?

Admittedly, we aren’t huge fans of the “must do” or “must see” attractions during our travels.  This may be because we think they will be too touristy, or maybe we are just snobbish about seeing things that pretty much everyone else already has.  Stonehenge is one of the most well-known sites to visit in the world so you can imagine our hesitation when planning to visit. Everyone knows and recognizes this famous circle of rocks, but we initially thought it may be better to see another, less visited stone circle in Avebury which was on our route as well. There are reasons sites make it to UNESCO status, though, and we decided we just couldn’t pass by so close and skip it.

Stonehenge Shadow

Driving from London we go to the area in the late afternoon and it was raining, so we decided to spend the night and get a fresh start in the morning. The George Hotel, a traditional 13th century inn.  It’s time-sloped floors really set the mood for our next day’s activity.  To visit Stonehenge you must buy a ticket and book a time.  The first time available was 9 am but we decided 10 am sounded better.

Another Stonehenge

Choosing When to Visit

Of course we were up before the alarm went off with excitement.  After eating breakfast we head over early, thinking we’d spend some time in the visitor’s center until our allotted 10 am time slot.  Maybe it was because of the time of year (we were there in late February), because it was Monday or because the day before was so rainy but we strolled in and were able to go to the site straight away around 9:15 am. Having a ticket booked in advance definitely made the process easier upon arrival.  The easiest way to get to the stones is to leave the visitor’s center on the free shuttle which drops you a short walk away. Others prefer to walk from the parking area, which looks like it would take 15 to 20 minutes. We were in the first group of the day which was about a dozen people. The cold wind was fully worth being there in such a small group. We felt like we had the place to ourselves!

Sunny Stonehenge

Following what we later realized was a common theme during our visit to southwest England, the sun came out at just the right time to provide a lovely view.  We were blessed with some beautiful morning blues, mixed with moody, gray clouds as the backdrop to the scene.  Our fellow guests were respectful and conscious of each others’ experience, which absolutely made the day that much more special.

Kings Barrow Ridge

Kings Barrow Ridge

The Mystery of this Megalithic Monument

No one is fully sure of exactly how or why the stones were set here in the first place. There are a multitude of theories, of course, but it’s precisely the mystery that continues to draw people to this little circle of half-tumbled rocks. Was it an ancient burial site for the elite? A place of healing? A temple? Did the Druids play a role? Was it built by aliens? The visitor’s center explores some of the theories in detail, and sheds light on very recent archaeological discoveries (2014) that call many previous theories into question. Stonehenge itself is set on the top of a hill in what is now a very large pasture.  This afforded views of other man made items on other nearby hill tops.  Notably, the Kings Barrow Ridge was off to the east.  Barrows are believed to be burial mounds of important people from the time.  Upon further scrutiny we noticed barrows on nearly all the hilltops, each affording a “view” to Stonehenge. If Stonehenge was indeed a temple to honor the dead, placing the barrows in a position to look upon Stonehenge is quite purposeful.

Stonehenge Builder Houses

The Visitor’s Center

After spending time in reflection, pondering the stones, we caught the bus back to the visitor’s center. the new center is well-designed, and filled with as much detailed information as you might care to digest. Outside, they had replica period houses and an interactive stone-moving experience. I couldn’t help but let my inner child out and give the stone pull a try.  It’s basically a mock up of how we believe such large stone could have been moved, but with a high tech twist.  You pull the rope and a computer gives you a reading of how many more people you would need in order to actually move the stone.  On my first try I would have needed 95 more people!  Not satisfied with that outcome, I gave the rope a few more tugs, with my best result being “only” 80 more people.  Of course there was no way I could maintain the force of a quick jerk to the rope so it’s same to say it would take MANY more people to move these stones!

Block Moving

Final Verdict

We both agree that our time spent at Stonehenge well exceeded our expectations.  We had heard that you couldn’t get close enough to the stones, and that it would be overrun with people. We didn’t feel either was the case. We found Stonehenge to be a powerful, special place. Within the past couple of years the site had gotten a remodel with a more natural feel being the goal, and for us it was successful.  Arriving on a weekday in the off season is also always a good recipe for small crowds.

Stonehenge Selfie

 Have you been to Stonehenge? Was it worth the visit?

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Food for Thought with Places People Stories http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-places-people-stories/ http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-places-people-stories/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 13:22:57 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14122 Food and drink are sustenance. We need both to live. But it’s much more complicated than that, isn’t it? Examining peoples’ relationship with food, we are able to examine many other elements of...

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Food and drink are sustenance. We need both to live. But it’s much more complicated than that, isn’t it? Examining peoples’ relationship with food, we are able to examine many other elements of society and culture. Food reflects our history, economics, environment . . . even our personality. As we travel, food can be an important “in” when it comes to experiencing local culture. While it’s not the only way, many travelers would agree it’s one of the most enjoyable, as evidenced in the unending stream of delectable meals flowing through social media. Our Food for Thought series examines this topic through interviews with bloggers who share their perspectives on how food influences their travels. This week’s interview is with Hanne, creator of the blog, Places People Stories. Hanne is a thinker, and her stories reflect her thoughtful observations of the world as she travels. Read on to find out hear her thoughts on everything from what she likes about fishing to her favorite insect snack!

BiopicMeet Hanne

Hi! I’m Hanne. A twenty-something travel junkie from Norway. So far, I have been to over 50 countries. Still, many more to go! In this blog I write a bit differently related to travel than the common “10 things to do in Bangkok/Paris/Madrid,” you name it! I focus more on the not so obvious, and share stories and experiences about places I have been and people I have met during 5 years of travels. …

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Food for Thought

The underlying idea of the “Food for Thought” series is that to truly experience a culture you must taste it. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

I could not agree more. When I travel I like to try most of the typical local food, and doing so have given me some of the best and memorable experiences I have had on my many travels.

Food in many ways reflect a culture, place, the people, their traditions, history and lifestyle. Though food is not the only way to experience a culture, it is for sure one of the most important. And I definitely think that a cultural experience is not complete without tasting the food.

For example I have been living in Bolivia for a long while now, and I have seen how important the local cuisine is for the Bolivians. It is their pride. I have truly become a big fan, as well. However, I have received many international volunteers through my job here that did not want to try any of the local foods. They preferred to stay at home a cook pasta with tomato sauce. And by doing so, I believe strongly that they missed out on one of the most important aspects of exploring the Bolivian culture.

Food for Thought

What food do you identify with “home?” Does it reflect something about your own culture or upbringing? Do you crave it while you’re away?

In Norway we eat a lot of seafood. When I am away, I especially miss salmon and shrimps. Fish, in many ways reflect the Norwegian culture. We have for hundreds of years lived on fish, and back in my family we have had a lot of fishermen. Most children growing up on the coast, learn to fish at an early age as well. I just love to catch my fish, and then eat it. It tastes extra good when you have fished it yourself. I think most families still eat fish 2-3 times a week for dinner.

In addition to this, Norwegians just love whole-wheat bread with cheese, meat or other delicious topping on. It is often eaten for breakfast, lunch and evening food. Maybe it does not sound so gourmet, but it is a big part of the culture and history. As we were a very poor country before, this is what people ate. Though today, the country is much richer and we could afford to eat more gourmet, we still keep to our bread and traditions.

How has travel affected the way you think about food?

Before I started to travel, I was very careful regarding trying new foods. I was very picky. After starting to travel, everything changed regarding to this. I understood that I will not die if I try a new dish. Furthermore, I figured that trying new dishes brings so much positive. Usually, you only have one chance to really try the local cuisine, and that is when you are in that country. You might try it in a restaurant in your home city, but usually it is not the same. Now, I try almost everything I come across when I am in a new country or place.

Do you have a technique to try and understand local cuisine? (ie: Attending cooking classes or food tours? Hunting the best street food?)

Often when I travel, I live with local people. I ask them which typical foods it is worth to try. They are usually willing and proud to share and tell me about their local cuisine. Because, who knows the local food better than the people living there? No one, not even a guidebook. Furthermore, they often cook some of that food for me, and we share together. Others dishes I go out to restaurants to eat or try in the street.

familymakingfoodformeIndia

Tell us about a memorable meal that was so special it is forever ingrained in your memory. Where was it and what set it apart? What was served, and who shared it with you?

In India, I lived with a local family. It was the Raksha Bandhan festival, and in this festival food is very important. I was invited to take a part of that as well. For a whole weekend, the family cooked delicious local food. I just love the Indian foods. We sat on the floor and eat with our hands.

I have a similar experience from the countryside in Uganda at Christmas 2011. I was celebrating with a local family that had prepared very tasteful foods, and we were all gathered on the floor eating it with our hand.

These are two experiences I will never forget.

DognNigeria

What food have you tried in your travels that some might find shocking or surprising? Would you eat it again?

I have tried dog in Nigeria. The worst thing of it all was that when we were eating, a lot of dogs were walking around us, not knowing that they might be next on the plate. I will never try this again though.

We also eat whale in Norway, which many find shocking.

Also I often eat grasshoppers, if I am in a country that serves it. I really love this snack. However, I prefer the small ones.

And just for fun, if you had to choose one country’s cuisine to eat for the rest of your life what would it be?

That must be Italian food. I love all kinds of pastas. I also love pizza. I will never get tired of that.

All images were provided by Hanne. You can connect with her on Places People Stories or via Social Media: Facebook or Twitter.

 

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Tunnel Visions in the Tunnelbana http://turtlestravel.com/stockholm-subway-art/ http://turtlestravel.com/stockholm-subway-art/#comments Wed, 25 Mar 2015 14:00:30 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14159 Stockholm Subway Art Spending time in major cities can get expensive, so we love finding ways to have fun without breaking the bank. Stockholm was no exception. The city’s network of...

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Stockholm Subway Art

Spending time in major cities can get expensive, so we love finding ways to have fun without breaking the bank. Stockholm was no exception. The city’s network of subterranean transport is a kaleidoscope of color, texture and symbolism. There are pieces by 150 different artists spread throughout most of Stockholm’s 100 or so stations. Styles include mosaic, painting, sculpture, tile and mixed media installations among other mediums. All have a different feel, but exposed rock in many of the stations creates a cave-like quality we found ourselves really digging (pun intended)! Since we were visiting in winter, exploring Stockholm subway art also turned out to be great cold-weather/rainy day activity.

We each purchased a ticket for 44 SEK (about $5.50) which entitled us free roaming on any subway line in Zone 1 (central Stockholm) for a total of 75 minutes. We were moving pretty fast to see as much as we could in that amount of time. If we did it again, we might opt for a “travel card,” which can be purchased for 115 SEK (about $14). This gives you 24-hour access.  Our route is mapped out below. You could just as easily start at a different station, making T-Centralen your main hub. We got a lot of good info for planning our initial exploration from Lola Akinmade Åkerström’s post on Slow Travel Stockholm. She traveled with one of the certified guides from the free weekly guided art tours run by Storstockholms Lokaltrafik, another option for checking out Stockholm subway art. (English tours available in June, July and August.)

Kungstragarden stockholm subway art

Kungsträdgården Station (Blue Line)

Since we were staying right near Kungsträdgården, a central Stockholm park, we began our tour at Kungsträdgården Station on the Blue Line. After descending the escalator, you’ll come upon what looks like an archaeological dig. In a cave-like setting, there are 17th and 18th century artifacts from Makalös Palace, which stood nearby, as well as relics from other areas of the city. You can see Roman columns, ancient streetlights, pots and statues. These items all belong to the National Museum, but have been on display here since the station was opened in 1977. The paintings in the station were done by Swedish artist Ulrik Samuelson for the station’s opening. He added to his work there again in 1987. Even the floors are painted. The colors are symbolic, and are supposed to remind us of the history of Kungsträdgården above: red for the gravel pathways green for the plants and trees of the garden itself and white for the marble statues that decorated the garden.

Central (4)

The Hub: T-Centralen

Just one stop away, the blue and white floral and leaf motifs of T-Centralen were painted by artist and sculptor Per Olof Ultvedt.  The main hall of the Blue Line connection at T-Centralen features silhouettes of workers who contributed to the making of the station. You can pick out men with hardhats up on scaffolding. They’re using power tools, hammers, drills, welding. Take time to check out the detail. We thought the colors gave the station a kind of Greek feel.

Hotorget stockholm subway art

Hötorget  and Thorildsplan (Green Line)

A quick transfer to the Green Line, and we hopped off at the very next stop, Hötorget. While interesting, this wasn’t a favorite. The light teal and neon remind many of a toilet, and the station is sometimes called the “bathroom station.”

Continuing on the Green Line, we exited at Thorildsplan. Swedish artist Lars Arrhenius was commissioned to design this station in 2008. Clearly, he was inspired by the pixels of 8-bit video games of the 1970s and 1980s, recreating scenes from games like Super Mario Brothers, Dig Dug and Pac-Man. We also found an appropriate friend for Donny in Oscar the Grouch.

We then backtracked to Fridhemsplan, which features a nautical theme, with a model ship in a glass case, lots of green shades, a compass and an anchor. From here, we switched back to the Blue Line.

Thorildsplan (3)

Solana Centrum (6)

Solna Centrum (Blue Line)

Solna Centrum has a distinctly political feel to it. Paintings by artists Anders Åberg and Karl-Olov Björk depicted social issues such as “rural depopulation and destruction of the environment.” There is a large section dedicated to the outdoors, with vast green forests and hills, moose, people fishing, etc. Most striking at this station is the deep, red ceiling. We went up the escalator just so we could descend again into the fiery depths.

Stadion (1)

Stadion (Red Line)

Back to T-Centralen and now running out of time, we ran to catch the Red Line, taking it to the Stadion Station. This is probably the most photographed station, with a huge rainbow as the central feature. It’s a happy atmosphere, with everything cheery and colorful. We imagined there must be a unicorn painted there somewhere. Let us know if you spot one! This station was designed by by Enno Hallek and Åke Pallarp in 1973 to commemorate the 1912 Olympics.

 

 

 

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Food for Thought with KarolinaPatryk http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-karolinapatryk/ http://turtlestravel.com/food-for-thought-with-karolinapatryk/#comments Fri, 20 Mar 2015 13:13:11 +0000 http://turtlestravel.com/?p=14129 The Food for Thought series, now entering its second year, continues to explore the intersection of food, travel and culture. Many travelers see food as a natural and enjoyable way to gain...

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The Food for Thought series, now entering its second year, continues to explore the intersection of food, travel and culture. Many travelers see food as a natural and enjoyable way to gain insight into a new destination. Exploring local markets and chatting with local residents about what they like to eat and why paves the way toward deeper conversations. This week we chat with Karolina of the blog KarolinaPatryk.com.

our pictureMeet Karolina and Patryk

“Karolina and Patryk are a young travelling couple who decided to follow their hearts and live a free life. They opened a company and started travelling around the world. On their blog, they inspire other people to fulfill their dreams and give best travel, relationship and making money online tips.”

Food for Thought

The underlying idea of the “Food for Thought” series is that to truly experience a culture you must taste it. Do you agree or disagree? Why?

Of course! Food is always a huge part of the whole culture. A wise man said: “you are what you eat.” Ingredients, meals, and spices constitute the entire culture of the country. Food is also smells. For us, the sense of smell is one of the most important senses. When you are abroad, you just need to try traditional dishes to understand locals.

What food do you identify with “home?” Does it reflect something about your own culture or upbringing?  Do you crave it while you’re away?

Definitely pierogi and schabowy z kapusta. We are from Poland so we are accustomed to fat, unhealthy and high-calorie food. Pierogi ruskie are dumplings filled with potato, cottage cheese and onion. Schabowy z kapusta is breaded fried pork with hot sauerkraut and potato.

We always miss these dishes when we abroad. What’s funny is that when we are in Poland, we rarely eat this kind of food! Only when we are far away from home do we miss our native flavors.

Patryk eating fish balls

How has travel affected the way you think about food?

We understood that eating is a big part of every culture when we started travelling. It’s not only about eating- it’s also preparing dishes and spending time together.

It’s different in every country. For example, in China people spend hours in the restaurant. They order plenty of dishes and lay them the middle of the table, so that everyone can try everything. It’s completely different from Europe. On the Old Continent, people eat fast, healthy and often alone. Eating is not celebrated like it is in Asia.

Do you have a technique to try and understand local cuisine? (ie: Attending cooking classes or food tours? Hunting the best street food?)

We always choose places where locals eat. We avoid ‘western’ restaurants and famous fast foods. The principle is simple: the less foreigners in the eatery, the better local food will be.

It happens very often that we are only foreigners in the restaurant. We have no idea how it works, but in a few minutes other Europeans or Americans come. Maybe because people subconsciously choose a place where there are already other foreigners?

Food for Thought

Tell us about a memorable meal that was so special it is forever ingrained in your memory. Where was it and what set it apart? What was served, and who shared it with you?

Definitely street food in Thailand! We absolutely LOVED it. At first we were a little afraid that we might get sick after eating it (it is not very hygienic to eat on the street). But all the worries disappeared with the first bite :). We most enjoyed the grilled meat and fish balls on a stick. Mmmm. yummy!

Karolina eating scorpion

What food have you tried in your travels that some might find shocking or surprising? Would you eat it again?

Scorpion. We tried it in Thailand and it was surprisingly… good! It tasted like chips ;).

We’ll definitely eat it again. We are going to Thailand in 3 weeks and we are planning to eat locust and other fried insects.

Tom Yum thai coconut soup

And just for fun, if you had to choose one country’s cuisine to eat for the rest of your life what would it be?

Asian cuisine. It’s really difficult to choose one but we’ll go for Thai or Vietnamese food.

Pad Thai, Tom Yum (spicy coconut soup) and Pho soup are our favourite dishes :).

All images provided by Karolina and Patryk.  Connect with them via Twitter, Instagram, G+, Youtube or Facebook!

 

 

 

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