Travel Photo Roulette Round 64: Dance

We are thrilled and honored to have been selected as the winner of Travel Photo Roulette’s Round 63!  Last week’s winner, Passports and Pamplemousse, presented the excellent theme “Hands at Work.” Our interpretation was this photo of a young deckhand working the lines on a boat about to set out on the journey from Siem Reap to Battambang, Cambodia. Be sure to check out the rest of the submissions as well.

Hands at Work

Young Deckhand, Tonle Sap

Travel Photo Roulette was started by Jeremy at Living the Dream as a way for travel and photography bloggers to showcase their photos from around this world. Since its founding in 2010, hundreds of amazing and inspiring photos have been submitted, each under a unique theme. For each round, independent travel bloggers are asked to submit their photos. Then a winner is chosen to host (and judge) the following round.

Round 64’s Theme is . . . “Dance”

For this round, we’ve chosen the theme “Dance.” In our travels we’ve seen dance as preservation of culture, dance as exercise and dance as expression of pure joy.  While the authenticity of some “staged” performances for tourists is a topic of debate, we’ve certainly seen true celebrations of culture, identity and heritage. We’ve been mesmerized by a Bonfire Noh performance in front of Heian-jingu Shrine in Kyoto and an evening’s performance of Legong and Barong traditional dance at the Royal Palace in Ubud, Bali. Then we have our own life-long memories of salsa and merengue til the wee hours while in Venezuela for the holidays or small-town gatherings where the stomps of joropo echoed across the plains, clubs in the Dominican Republic and a rumba on the streets of Havana.

So show us your favorite moments when you’ve observed something amazing expressed in dance, whether it be an organized performance, an impromptu celebration, or a romantic moment.  Our photo below was taken in a park in a large park in Beijing. There, people gather to waltz, jitterbug and tango the morning or evening away. For us it was an unusual sight, but Chinese fitness dancing is apparently all the rage these days, almost a national hobby, especially among older local residents.

Dancing in the Park, Beijing

Dancing in the Park, Beijing

Contest Overview

The Travel Photo Roulette rotates through travel and/or photography blogs.  The winner of the previous round of Travel Photo Roulette hosts the subsequent round on their own blog. The new host then chooses the next theme, a generic keyword or phrase, and players submit their interpretations of the theme over the course of the week of the contest.

At the end of the week, the hosting blogger chooses their favorite photo from the submissions and displays it as the week’s winning entry. They then include direction to the new host for the next round. Readers can attempt to lobby the author toward a certain photo via comments or the #PhotoRoulette hashtag on Twitter – the author can accept or ignore any lobby as they see fit. The game is repeated with the winner hosting the following week’s game and choosing a phrase for new photo submissions.

Entry Guidelines

  • One submission per blog (so sites that have 2+ authors only get one entry).
  • Post processing is permitted, but photo altering (ie. Photoshopping) is not.
  • Abstract submissions are welcomed as long as it fits within the interpretation of the chosen phrase. (Remember, the hosting blogger chooses the winner, so if they cannot understand the submission, you might not win!)
  • Please try and keep your images medium-sized and web-optimized (600-800px).
  • If you win, keep the following in mind when choosing a new theme:
    • Keep phrases general so that all bloggers can participate. Specific items like “Eiffel Tower” should be avoided but rather made open-ended like “monuments.” For variety, it is okay to say focused things such as “monuments at night” which most of us have pictures of. Phrases can be generic ‘signs,’ or abstract ‘religion.’
    • Abstract thoughts are appreciated, but keep it within the realm that all readers will understand. No “Kafka-esque”, or “Overlooking Creation”. Use something that is able to be interpreted by all.
    • After 1 year, phrases can be reused, however new photos must be submitted.
  • No obscene pictures or phrases allowed. Suggestive phrases and photography can be accepted, but please keep it within reason.
  • Keep the ideas and photos fresh!
  • Pictures from your entire portfolio are fair to submit. You do not have to take the photo within the week of the contest period to submit it.
  • Most importantly, all photographs must be your own.
  • One last rule, since this is a competition for travel and photography bloggers, you must have a travel/photography blog to enter. Sorry!

How to Submit Your Photos

To enter in the Photo Roulette competition just leave a comment below with a link to the image (whether Flickr, Picasa or your own site) so it can be uploaded to this post. Don’t forget to provide a brief description or caption for the photo so we can all get some background on what’s happening.

Check back here throughout the week to see all the entries as they come in and feel free to comment on them. The contest runs for 7 days from today, with the submission dates being September 4rd to 11th. (No more entries will be accepted after 11:59 pm EST on September 11th.) The winner will be announced a few days after the deadline, and they will host round #65.

Spread the Word!

Tweet using the hashtag #PhotoRoulette and share this page with your friends on Facebook, StumbleUpon G+, or your favorite Social Media outlet. The more the merrier! Comments on photo entries are strongly encouraged! We expect to need all the help we can get when it comes time to making decision.

Please remember, submit your entries by September 11, 2013!

We can’t wait to see your photos and hear the stories behind them!

Past Photo Roulette Winners and Hosts

The following is a list of the previously played rounds of the game and the hosting blogger for each.  As the game has been running for a few years now, a few of the winners are no longer blogging and the posts have since been removed from the list below.  Click the host’s link to go directly to that entry to see some stunning photographs from the chosen term/phrase!

1. Nov 4–10, 2010 – Living the Dream – “Animals”
2. Nov 17–24, 2010 – Skinny Backpacker – “Road Signs”
3. Nov 29–Dec 6, 2010 – Dream a Little Dream– “Street Art”
4. Dec 8–15, 2010 – Flashpacker HQ – “Festival”
5. Dec 17–24, 2010 – Over Yonderlust – “Landmarks”
6. Dec 26–Jan 2, 2011 – Don’t Ever Look Back – “Beaches”
7. Jan 5–12, 2011 – ThePlanetD – “Portraits”
8. Jan 15–22, 2011 – Travel with a Mate – “Motion”
9. Jan 26–Feb 3, 2011 – Johnny Vagabond – “Water”
10. Feb 8–15, 2011 – Ken Kaminesky – “Urban”
11. Feb 21–27, 2011 – Travels of Adam– “Friday Night”
12. Mar 7–13, 2011 – Itchy Feet Chronicles – “The Journey”
13. Mar 19– 25, 2011 – Brendan’s Adventures – “Changing Seasons”
14. Apr 4–10, 2011 – Shutterfeet – “Storytelling”
15. Apr 13–21, 2011 – 10 Times One – “Piousness”
16. Apr 26–May 4, 2011 – Beached Eskimo – “Learning”
17. May 21–27, 2011 – Travel Junkies – “Architecture”
18. Jun 1–7, 2011 – Destination World – “Transportation”
19. Jun 8–15, 2011 – Living the Dream – “Paradise”
20. Jun 21-28, 2011 – Vagabond Quest – “Clothes”
21. Jul 4-11, 2011 – The Unframed World – “Symmetry”
22. Jul 16-25, 2011 – Beached Eskimo – “Home”
23. Jul 31 – Aug 7, 2011 – BackPackerBanter – “Inspiration”
24. Aug 14 – 21, 2011 – WanderingTrader – “Darkness”
25. Aug 28 – Sep 4, 2011 – Finding the Universe – “Tranquillity”
26. Sep 12 – 19, 2011 – Fearful Adventurer – “Food”
27. Sep 23 – 30, 2011 – Adventures of a GoodMan – “City”
28. Oct 06 – 13, 2011 – Globe-Trekking.com – “Reflections”
29. Oct 17 – 24, 2011 – Scene With A Hart – “Framing”
30. Nov 9 – 16, 2011 – Vagabond Quest – “Silhouettes”
31. Nov 26 – Dec 3, 2011 – Hecktic Travels – “Music”
32. Dec 11 – Dec 18, 2011 – Globetrotter Girls – “Love”
33. Dec 25 – Jan 1, 2012– Man on the lam – “Humor”
34. Jan 8 – Jan 15, 2012 – My Walkabout – “Winter”
35. Jan 15 – Jan 22, 2012 – The Art of Slow Travel – “Blue”
36. Feb 6 – Feb 13, 2012 – Ten times One – “Depth of the Field”
38. March 7 – March 14, 2012 – Nomadbiba – “Sunshine”
39. March 24 – 31, 2012 – Travel With Kat – “Local Character”
40. April 10 – 16, 2012 – The Travel Bunny – “Street Scene”
41. April 23 – April 30, 2012 – Adventure Crow – “Spirit of the Country”
42. May 7 – 14, 2012 – Food Travel Bliss – “Evening”
43. May 17 – May 24, 2012 – Matt Gibson – “Adventure”
44. May 30th – June 6, 2012 – Flashpacker HQ – “Once In A Lifetime”
45. July 23rd – July 30, 2012 – Skinny Backpacker – “Surreal”
46. August 10 – August 17, 2012 – 2away – “Smile”
47. Aug 27 – Sept 2, 2012 – Bridges and Balloons – “Excellent Splendour of the Universe”
48. Sept 8 – Sept 15, 2012 – The GypsyNester – “What the ?!”
49. Oct 22 – Oct 29, 2012 – Runaway Juno – “Sweet”
50. Nov 12 – Nov 19, 2012 – GQ Trippin – “Play”
51. Nov 25 – Dec 2, 2012 – Life’s Little Victories – “Friendship”
52. Dec 15-22, 2012 – Breakaway Backpacker – “Face”
53. Jan 14-21, 2013 – Fly, Icarus, Fly – “Serendipity”
54. Feb 1-8, 2013 – Travel Transmissions – “Lost in Thought”
55. Feb 15-22, 2013 – Wanderlusters – “The Natural World”
56. Mar 17-24, 2013 – Travel Junkies – “Patterns”
57. April 25-May 3rd, 2013 – Living the Dream – “Your First Time”
58. May12-19th, 2013 – Getting Stamped – “As The Sun Goes Down”
59. June 6-13th, 2013 – The GypsyNester – “Cheesy Tourist Diversions”
60. June 27-July 4, 2013 – Boomeresque – “Revolution”
61. July 18-July 25,2013 – Breakaway Backpacker – “Colorful”
62. August 14-August 21, 2013 – Around This World – “Mountains”
63. August 25th – September 1st 2013: Passports and Pamplemousse – “Hands at Work”
64. September 4th – 11th, 2013: TurtlesTravel – “Dance”

This Round’s Entries

Photo captions have been provided by the contestants, and provide a bit of background on the setting and some insight on the capture!

#1- Contributed by Cassie at Ever in Transit

Dancing Dog Photo

The dog was named Casimiro and he belonged to the owner of the language school I studied at in Guanajuato, Mexico. Casimiro would hang around the building during the day, wandering into and out of classrooms searching for crumbs under the desks. Sometimes his owner would call out looking for him, “Casí?” My name is similar so, naturally, I thought he was talking to me.
Between my afternoon classes one day, I caught this photo of a local boy on his way home from school. His eyes lit up when he saw the dog lounging on the front stoop and he ran to hug him, eventually pulling him into this silly waltz.

#2- Contributed by GypsyNester

Tango photo

“The old port area of La Boca in Buenos Aires breathes tango. Colorful and vibrant, I found myself quickly immersed in the sultry music and dance of Argentina. A photographer’s dream.”

#3 Contributed by Kle at Keep Calm and Travel

My shot was taken during a break, where my little ballerinas Yung and Hong started “free-styling”and creating their own choreography, including synchronized jumps :) That day was so much fun!

My shot was taken during a break, where my little ballerinas Yung and Hong started “free-styling”and creating their own choreography, including synchronized jumps :) That day was so much fun!

 #4 Contributed by Les Petits Pas de Juls

Traditional dances are held every monday night on the Main Square in Merida, Yuc., Mexico. Typical poems and rhymes are shared with the tourists and locals, the traditional costumes worn by local men and women shown and explained and dances last 1 hour at the sound of the music called “jarana.”

Traditional dances are held every monday night on the Main Square in Merida, Yuc., Mexico. Typical poems and rhymes are shared with the tourists and locals, the traditional costumes worn by local men and women shown and explained and dances last 1 hour at the sound of the music called “jarana.”

 

#5 Contributed by Bianca at Nomad Biba

This is the morenada, a typical Andean dance from Bolivia, one of the many I saw while traveling there. I just loved the parades in Bolivia; so full of live, colours and music!

This is the morenada, a typical Andean dance from Bolivia, one of the many I saw while traveling there. I just loved the parades in Bolivia; so full of live, colours and music!

#6 Contributed by Tom at Travel Past 50

One day in Quito, I ran into an exhibition of folk dancing in the central patio of the Archbishop’s Palace in the Plaza Grande. There were several groups, but the one that intrigued me most was the troupe of young girls who centered their dance around gayly decorated large plastic soda bottles which they balanced on their heads and hands as they happily spun around.

One day in Quito, I ran into an exhibition of folk dancing in the central patio of the Archbishop’s Palace in the Plaza Grande. There were several groups, but the one that intrigued me most was the troupe of young girls who centered their dance around gayly decorated large plastic soda bottles which they balanced on their heads and hands as they happily spun around.

#7 Contributed by James at Fly, Icarus, Fly

My submission was taken a few weeks ago as I spent the day watching a rehearsal of Cinderella at the hundred year old Saigon Opera House. It was my first ballet ever and it was amazing to see the Vietnamese performers do so well despite having much less training than their counterparts in more developed countries. Here, the fairy godmother takes her place in the limelight…

My submission was taken a few weeks ago as I spent the day watching a rehearsal of Cinderella at the hundred year old Saigon Opera House. It was my first ballet ever and it was amazing to see the Vietnamese performers do so well despite having much less training than their counterparts in more developed countries. Here, the fairy godmother takes her place in the limelight…

#8 Contributed by Globetrottergirls

We loved the traditional dances during the Guelaguetza festival in Oaxaca, Mexico, that we were lucky enough to witness a couple of years ago

We loved the traditional dances during the Guelaguetza festival in Oaxaca, Mexico, that we were lucky enough to witness a couple of years ago

#9 Contributed by Greg at Adventures of a Goodman

While it’s not a dance in the traditional sense, an Indian “Puja” is choreographed, ritualistic and completely beautiful. A puja is a religious ritual offered to various deities, distinguished persons or special guests. It is meant as a sign of honor, worship and devotional attention. Traditional acts of a puja include bowing, making offerings and chanting. The primary locations for a puja are in the home or at a temple, though it technically can take place anywhere.

While it’s not a dance in the traditional sense, an Indian “Puja” is choreographed, ritualistic and completely beautiful.  A puja is a religious ritual offered to various deities, distinguished persons or special guests. It is meant as a sign of honor, worship and devotional attention. Traditional acts of a puja include bowing, making offerings and chanting. The primary locations for a puja are in the home or at a temple, though it technically can take place anywhere.

#10 Contributed by Debbie at Travel With Intent

Dance is so evocative of country and culture, a perfect them choice for a travel blog. It was hard to choose for me but I’ve gone for the Sardana because it is such an important part of Catalan tradition.

Dance is so evocative of country and culture, a perfect theme choice for a travel blog. It was hard to choose for me but I’ve gone for the Sardana because it is such an important part of Catalan tradition.

#11 Contributed by Eva at Jauntblog

I’ve included a link to a photo I took in Buenos Aires at the Cafe Tortoni of two tango dancers during a show. My shutter was too slow to catch the dancers’ photo, but it caught their feet and embrace as they spun wildly across the stage. I loved that they didn’t come out because it helped capture the crazy passion and frenzy of the dance.

I’ve included a link to a photo I took in Buenos Aires at the Cafe Tortoni of two tango dancers during a show. My shutter was too slow to catch the dancers’ photo, but it caught their feet and embrace as they spun wildly across the stage. I loved that they didn’t come out because it helped capture the crazy passion and frenzy of the dance.

#12 Contributed by Natasha at World Wandering Kiwi

My post is on London’s famous Notting Hill Carnival, held at the end of August. Full of colour and music, the dancing is literally everywhere.

My post is on London’s famous Notting Hill Carnival, held at the end of August. Full of colour and music, the dancing is literally everywhere.

#13 Contributed by Heather at Ferreting Out the Fun

During a busy weekend visit to Beijing, we were racing to get to the Temple of Heaven before it closed for the day. While making our way down a lengthy pavilion where locals had gathered to play cards, a man with an accordion started playing the song Jingle Bells. This was in mid-June, mind you. Suddenly, a lady jumped up and started dancing gleefully, like Jingle Bells was her favorite song in the world! Despite our rush, we stopped to enjoy every strange and charming second! It’s one of my favorite memories from that entire weekend!

During a busy weekend visit to Beijing, we were racing to get to the Temple of Heaven before it closed for the day. While making our way down a lengthy pavilion where locals had gathered to play cards, a man with an accordion started playing the song Jingle Bells. This was in mid-June, mind you. Suddenly, a lady jumped up and started dancing gleefully, like Jingle Bells was her favorite song in the world! Despite our rush, we stopped to enjoy every strange and charming second! It’s one of my favorite memories from that entire weekend!

#14 Contributed by Stuart at Am I Nearly There Yet?

When we stayed in Krabi,Thailand, there was a big local festival – The streets were packed with locals all having a great time – eating, drinking and breakdancing!! These kids were pretty hard-core – no spin mat or anything, just spinning on the bare concrete. They make them tough in Thailand!

When we stayed in Krabi,Thailand, there was a big local festival – The streets were packed with locals all having a great time – eating, drinking and breakdancing!!
These kids were pretty hard-core – no spin mat or anything, just spinning on the bare concrete. They make them tough in Thailand!

#15 Contributed by Adam at Getting Stamped

We had a happened to visit a Mayan Village and school during the festival “Dia de Lempira”. The school was buzzing, and classrooms were full of dancing kids!

We had a happened to visit a Mayan Village and school during the festival “Dia de Lempira”. The school was buzzing, and classrooms were full of dancing kids!

#16 Contributed by Meagan at Life Outside of Texas

Our favorite dance performance was the hula dancers in Fiji. They were so beautiful and we just happened to be in the right place at the right time to see the show and it’s one we will never forget!

Our favorite dance performance was the hula dancers in Fiji. They were so beautiful and we just happened to be in the right place at the right time to see the show and it’s one we will never forget!

#17 Contributed by Josh at Peanuts or Pretzels

Love this theme… This brought back so many great memories of our impromptu dance in the streets of Ennis in County Claire, Ireland

Love this theme… This brought back so many great memories of our impromptu dance in the streets of Ennis in County Claire, Ireland

#18 Contributed by Kris at The World Is Our District

We saw this guy dancing by himself on the beaches of Zanzibar…something tells me he was doing it for the cameras;) But we were happy to take the shot!

We saw this guy dancing by himself on the beaches of Zanzibar…something tells me he was doing it for the cameras;) But we were happy to take the shot!

About the author

Free-spirited traveler at peace on the slow road. Packs light and treads lightly. Tamara writes about the nomadic lifestyle and slow travel along with budget-friendly tips and destination guides.